Thursday, July 24, 2008

Sorry Caleb Campbell, but now it's time to do your Duty


A few months ago, the young man pictured above, Lieutenant Caleb Campbell, lost his focus because the Army told him he could go play pro football. Now, there have been many talented players in the history of Army football. All of them have understood that they would not be professional football players because the Army required them to repay the citizens of this country for their world class education by serving their country for 5 years as officers in the Army.
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Fair, equitable, honorable requirement.
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Well, the Army thought about this stupid change to their long standing policy and said to Lieutenant Campbell yesterday "Sorry, son. We were wrong. It IS more important for you to do your duty to your country first, just like the 50,000+ graduates before you. You can go play with your football later." Here's a link to the article on Yahoo:
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Do not feel sorry for this young man. Be glad that more responsible and intelligent heads prevailed and forced him to do the right thing...forced him to do his duty to his country.
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He is also not going off to war any time soon as he will be heading back to the Academy to help as a graduate assistant in the Department of Athletics. That assignment will have him doing something for others who want to play football at Army....a much more honorable way to keep a hand in football...
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He did not pay to go to West Point, YOU paid for him to go with your tax dollars.
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He played a game and was willing to let his 900+ other classmates pay for their educations with service to their country, including his teammates, while he went to play a game.
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His actions were selfish, self-centered, and an embarrassment to all of us who served our country after we graduated. (Yes, I graduated there in 1987 and served on active duty and in the reserves until 1998).
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Thank you, Uncle Sam, for getting it right.
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Go serve your country, Caleb Campbell. Do the right thing.

1 comment:

Peter said...

Forget that it's the right thing, forget that he made a commitment, forget that 50,000 others served after graduating. I have two words to end all conversation regarding this controversy...Pat Tillman.